Mukti

Books

Some time ago, there was a facebook meme about 10 books:

List 10 books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t take more than a few minutes and do not think too hard. They do not have to be the great works of literature, just the ones that have affected you in some way. Tag 10 friends and me so I can see your list.

Over the fold, for archival purposes, are two lists — one general, the other economics related.

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Ideas that went nowhere…..

Posted in development, economics, labour, macro, micro, political economy by jrahman on January 12, 2015

….. because life got in the way.

Okay, that’s a bit melodramatic.  Let’s start again.  It used to be the case that to have a professional career as an economist in America, you needed a PhD.  That’s changing a lot.  There’s a general glut of PhDs.  And organisations such as the IMF are now more interested in people with practical experiences than half a decade or more of often impractical academic training.  In any case, outside America, PhDs were always for those who wanted to pursue an academic career.  So, other than the vanity of being addressed as Dr Rahman, I’ve never really seen much return from doing a PhD.

And yet, every now and then, I think about the ideas over the fold and wonder what might have been.

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সাতকাহন

Posted in action, Drama, economics, foreign policy, institutions, macro, movies, music, Rights, rock, thriller, War crimes by jrahman on August 10, 2012

Seven trashes collected by the senses.

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সাতকাহন

Seven trashes collected by the senses.

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সাতকাহন

Posted in Bollywood, economics, ethnic tensions, history, Islamists, macro, micro, movies, politics, science, trade by jrahman on March 2, 2012

Seven trashes collected by the senses.

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The ways of our lives

Posted in Bollywood, culture, development, economics, history, macro, movies, music, politics, society by jrahman on October 19, 2011

I don’t know whether the West has anything like the ‘social drama’ (সামাজিক  in Bangla) genre of Desi films.  Hrishikesh Mukherjee’s Abhimaan is a very good example of this genre.  There is great music — composed by SD Burman, sung by Lata Mungeshkar and Mohammed Rafi: arguably two of the greatest voices of the 20th century.  Jaya Bachchan gives one of the best performances of her life, while a young Amitabh Bachchan does not play an angry man.  There is no dhishum dhishum.  But there is some poignant social commentary.  Nothing too radical or risque mind you.  And all ends happily, just as any great Desi movie should — we don’t believe in sequels, it’s always happily everafter for us.

Oh, did I mention great music?  This song is hardly the best in the movie.  But this post is not about music.  Not directly anyhow.  Rather, this song captures an interesting point about how we live.

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